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Opium to Java



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Opium smoking was a widespread social custom in nineteenth-century Java, and commercial trade in opium had far-reaching economic and political implications. As in many of the Dutch territories in the Indonesian archipelago, the drug was imported from elsewhere and sold throughout the island under a government monopoly - a system of revenue 'farms'. These monopoly franchises were regulated by the government and operated by members of Java's Chinese elite, who were frequently also local officials appointed by the Dutch. The farms thus helped support large Chinese patronage networks that vied for control of rural markets throughout Java.James Rush explains the workings of the opium farm system during its mature years by measuring the social, economic, and political reach of these monopolies within the Dutch-dominated colonial society. His analysis of the opium farm incorporates the social history of opium smoking in Java and of the Chinese officer elite that dominated not only the opium farming but also the island's Chinese community and much of its commercial economy.He describes the relations among the various classes of Chinese and Javanese, as well as the relation of the Chinese elite to the Dutch, and he traces the political interplay that smuggling and the black market stimulated among all these elements. An important contribution to the social and political history of Southeast Asia and now brought back to life as a member of Equinox Publishing's Classic Indonesia series, this book gives a new dimension to our knowledge of nineteenth-century Javanese society and the processes of social control and economic dominance during the colonial period.JAMES R. RUSH is a historian of modern Southeast Asia whose other works include The Last Tree: Reclaiming the Environment in Tropical Asia; Java: A Travellers' Anthology; and several volumes of contemporary Asian biography in the Ramon Magsaysay Awards series. His is associate professor of history at Arizona State University.






Opium smoking was a widespread social custom in nineteenth-century Java, and commercial trade in opium had far-reaching economic and political implications. As in many of the Dutch territories in the Indonesian archipelago, the drug was imported from elsewhere and sold throughout the island under a government monopoly - a system of revenue 'farms'. These monopoly franchises were regulated by the government and operated by members of Java's Chinese elite, who were frequently also local officials appointed by the Dutch. The farms thus helped support large Chinese patronage networks that vied for control of rural markets throughout Java.James Rush explains the workings of the opium farm system during its mature years by measuring the social, economic, and political reach of these monopolies within the Dutch-dominated colonial society. His analysis of the opium farm incorporates the social history of opium smoking in Java and of the Chinese officer elite that dominated not only the opium farming but also the island's Chinese community and much of its commercial economy.He describes the relations among the various classes of Chinese and Javanese, as well as the relation of the Chinese elite to the Dutch, and he traces the political interplay that smuggling and the black market stimulated among all these elements. An important contribution to the social and political history of Southeast Asia and now brought back to life as a member of Equinox Publishing's Classic Indonesia series, this book gives a new dimension to our knowledge of nineteenth-century Javanese society and the processes of social control and economic dominance during the colonial period.JAMES R. RUSH is a historian of modern Southeast Asia whose other works include The Last Tree: Reclaiming the Environment in Tropical Asia; Java: A Travellers' Anthology; and several volumes of contemporary Asian biography in the Ramon Magsaysay Awards series. His is associate professor of history at Arizona State University.


Its efforts to suppress the opium trade led to two trade wars known as the Opium Wars. AU Rush James R. Opium to Java Revenue Farming and Chinese Enterprise in Colonial Indonesia 18601910 Asia East by South James Rush on Amazon.com. Opium cases ordered to be destroyed by President Xu 260. OpiumSomniferum 008Gb.wav OpiumWild Java 001G.wav OpiumWild Java 002A.wav OpiumWild Java 003Eb.wav OpiumWild Java 004Eb.wav OpiumWind 001Ab.wav OpiumWind 002Eb.wav OpiumZexu Lin 001Db.wav OpiumZexu Lin 002Ab.wav OpiumZexu Lin 003D.wav OpiumZexu Lin 004Bb.wav OpiumZexu Lin 005B.wav OpiumZexu Lin 006D.wav OpiumZexu Lin. Berkeley University of California Press 2000.


Javarush

Rush Penerbit Mata Bangsa 2000 Tebal 624 halaman Kondisi Bekas cukup Harga Rp. In 1870 for instance he claims that opium comprised fully onetenth of all imports and exports in the region. The Hague Martinius Nijhoff. A detailed history of opium and heroin from 3400 B.C. Add tags for Opium to Java revenue farming and Chinese enterprise in colonial Indonesia. The two books under review here provide specific insight into and a broad understanding of opium and the economies and societies of Singapore and Java from 1800 to 1910. 52 POR 53 156158 163. opium was a custom widely observed among Javas Chinese and Javanese populations by the 1860s. Meski begitu orang Jawa ditengarai sudah menggunakan opium jauh sebelum kedatangan Belanda. Therefore the actual opium distribution in Java had to be done by indigenous people who knew the ways to reach the consumers. 1870 As the power of the Roman Empire declined the lands to the south and east of the Mediterranean Sea became incorporated into the Islamic Empires. AbeBooks.com Opium to Java Revenue Farming and Chinese Enterprise in Colonial Indonesia 18601910 Asia East by South 9780801422188 by James .


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